Brain drain and labor migration in Nigeria

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The Problem Statement

Migration poses as one of the critical challenges facing Nigeria. This connotes why people leave their country of origin for better living conditions. These reasons can be seen in the light of the economic and security situations, conflicts and insurgency, academic aspirations and unemployment amongst others.

It is fortunate to reiterate that this trend will likely continue in the anticipated future as highly skilled professional Nigerians travel for more advancement as the country creates no enabling environment for them but emigrate foreign professionals to thrive.

More so, irregular migration and trafficking pose a great threat to our development. The Labor migration policy focuses on the needs of migrant workers to optimize benefits towards the development and support of their families and communities in countries of origin and destination.

Nevertheless, Gender-specific migration and conflict over mandate are among the challenges facing migration governance in Nigeria.

The Policy Solution

The policy enjoys financial support from the European Union and the IOM Development Fund which will aid in addressing many of the challenges of labor migration.

The effort of the government in uplifting her effort in developing the sectors of the economy will go a long way in reducing the high rate of poverty and unemployment. This will increase more manpower and create jobs. It is pertinent to improve the welfare and living conditions of labourers and their households.

This could be achieved by creating standard and conducive working environments for workers, providing up-to-date working equipment and giving workers timely and adequate remuneration to meet their needs. Working incentives such as free medicals, improved housing allowance and transportation should also be provided to reduce total dependence on their salaries.

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NIGAC Constructive Position/Take

Nigeria is currently the seventh most populous country in the world, with 206 million people. By 2100, it is projected to be the world’s third most populous country – ahead of the U.S. – with 733 million people, according to United Nations estimates. Nigeria is expected to add more people than any other country during that span.

It is no secret that many people in Nigeria have considered leaving the country. Insecurity, worsening economic situations, unemployment rate and insurgency have been listed as some of the reasons.

As a consequence of slow economic growth, a ballooning population and years of failed leadership, Nigeria is not only the poverty capital of the world but is set to remain so for at least a generation given its alarmingly low human capital spending.

It is about time the Federal Government wakes and initiate policies that would stop this ever-increasing brain drain.

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